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What To Do When Your Wife Suspects That You Have AS

"My wife suspects that I have Asperger Syndrome. I often wonder the same thing. She's been pushing me to seek a diagnosis. How exactly do they diagnose an adult who may (or may not) have this disorder? And is it ever too late to seek a diagnosis (I’m 32-years-old!)?"

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5 comments:

  1. In Seattle we were told that they don't give adult diagnosis. They figure if you have survived this long, then no need for diagnosis. There are people that can provide treatment/ therapy for "Asperigan" traits.. At least that is what my husband has been told. We were told it is more important that children receive the diagnosis so they gave access to Services. My 6 yr old has Aspergers & my husband has been told he is too, but they can't provide the diagnosis. He is seeing someone who specializes in adult Aspergers

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  2. I was aged 48 before I got diagnosed as suffering from AS/Asperger's Syndrome. I recall reading up about the symptoms at a mental health conditions site on the net; I found that I identified with nearly all that was mentioned there; maybe, 80+%! Eventually, I plucked up sufficient inner courage to go visit my local G.P. doctor, asking them to refer me for a possible diagnosis. I went to see the 'mental health' assessment doctor for around 3 times...1 hour long session per week; and, at the end of these sessions my diagnosis was confirmed 'officially' speaking. Next, they sent me to a group session to go and meet with other AS individuals; so we could discuss and understand our own disorder more. It was interesting meeting others with AS. However, quite honestly, AS tends to affect everyone slightly differently; as some symptoms can be very highly pronounced...whilst other symptoms may be virtually non-existent in others/-etc.; thus, each AS individual tends to be somewhat 'unique' to themselves. Has my own AS diagnosis helped? I guess, in some ways it did, in that it explains a lot about the way I tend to feel/act both internally/externally; it's due to a, quite clearly, 'recognized' condition...and, not just something springing out of mere air. I feel I know and understand myself a lot more now; and, there are reason for why I do what I do; think like I think; and, do often feel odd/like I don't fit in; am a total outsider; tend to follow my own 'special' interests. However, with all that said and done; I should like to add that we as human beings are, really and truly, without any clear 'limits'; so, I don't believe that anybody should be entirely confined for all the rest of their lives to fitting in with some smug 'label'. Even people who do suffer from depression do vary a lot in range...from mild to severe depression(suicidal); and, they too can experience happiness and being 'up', sometimes. Thus, any strict label is, indeed, limiting; we as human beings...who are constantly capable of growing and developing ourselves...are far more than is any 'official' label can say. So, ultimately, the way I feel about it is...a part of me is AS/another part is just 'normal'. There are days when I tend to 'live inside of my own world', keeping myself largely to myself, much preferring to be alone; and, there are days when I go and happily socialize just like any 'normal' person does, instead. In the end, I'm not a over-simplistic label; instead, I'm just a very 'complex' human being. ;-) GOOD LUCK with getting your own diagnosis. Oh, I should add, they didn't prescribe for me any drugs/or, counselling; so, in that sense, at least, my life didn't change. I don't know if there are AS people who have to take drugs/counselling to support their condition? Also, one other thing, there is a thing called having 'co-morbid conditions'; where more than one 'mental health' condition exists together in the 'one' same person. So, you could have say AS + BiPolar/-etc. -(I heard BiPolar people often need to take drugs.)- Like I said, already, every AS person is 'different' from the next to some more or less degree; and, nobody is exactly the same. That's why it's good to get yourself 'officially' diagnosed; so you can understand exactly where it is that you stand...am I either this/or, that...???

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  3. I am an autism mom and an ASD specialist. I commonly assess adults for Aspergers. I can help you find someone who will do the evaluation (I can only see clients in Iowa and Florida.) I have found that the diagnosis really helps clarify and explain not only to yourself but also to others (spouse, boss, friends, family) and a thorough eval will identify strengths to use as you work on the challenges that go along with an ASD.

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  4. I was diagnosed in my late 40s. I had always had trouble with social interactions and was a very anxious child. Bullied at school and as an adult worked so much better on my own. I suffered from and still have high anxiety levels and it was this that prompted my diagnosis. First I was misdiagnosed with bipolar disorder . On one of visits to psych the replacement on the day felt I probably was on the autism spectrum. Two more psychs and a psychologists and I was diagnosed. I saw an OT for some fairly significant sensory issues which still plague me. Getting the diagnosis allowed me to breath. I was able to make sense of why I had no friends was useless at social outings never really understood if people were mad at me. I could also take a step back from horrible sensory situations like crowded shopping malls. Now I pick and choose where I will go socially. I don't feel so " obliged" to put myself through stuff. I have some difficult things going on in my life so save my anixety energy for them. Others needed the diagnosis more than I did. They needed to label me. I have a son a nephew and niece with autism too. Hurts that they may have it from my genes.

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  5. Dx'd at age 60; after wife suspected it. Best thing I've done. Probably saved my marriage and surely was a conduit for better understanding.

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